10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet this Week! #9

 

Where’s my bike?

Courtesy of Youtube.

You can get a rundown on the making of the vid at Redbull (cheers again Phil!)

 

2. Beautiful pictures from the world of Ballet

Photographers Ken Browar and Deborah Ory have produced a beautiful, almost surreal book documenting the gravity-defying world of ballet in The Art of Movement.

In a series of moody, romanticized snapshots, the photographers have captured some of the best ballerinas and leading men from across the globe, and offered a rare and unique glimpse into the world of dance that’s rarely seen in this context of movement and light.

Beautifully shot, great composition (and also a bit of eye-candy for all the boys and girls)!

Robert Fairchild and Tiler Peck of New York City Ballet.
Robert Fairchild and Tiler Peck of New York City Ballet.
Ashley Ellis, a principal at the Boston Ballet.
Ashley Ellis, a principal at the Boston Ballet.
Miriam Miller of the New York City Ballet.
Miriam Miller of the New York City Ballet.
Misty Copeland and Alexandre Hammoudi of the American Ballet Theatre.
Misty Copeland and Alexandre Hammoudi of the American Ballet Theatre.
Charlotte Landreau, a soloist at the Martha Graham Dance Company.
Charlotte Landreau, a soloist at the Martha Graham Dance Company.
Michael Jackson Jr, Daniel Harder and Sean Aaron Carom of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.
Michael Jackson Jr, Daniel Harder and Sean Aaron Carom of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.
Chase Finlay, a principal at the New York City Ballet.
Chase Finlay, a principal at the New York City Ballet.
Rachael McLaren of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.
Rachael McLaren of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.
Xin Ying, a principal at the Martha Graham Dance Company.
Xin Ying, a principal at the Martha Graham Dance Company.
Fana Tesfagiorgis of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.
Fana Tesfagiorgis of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.
Zachary Catazaro, a soloist at the New York City Ballet.
Zachary Catazaro, a soloist at the New York City Ballet.
Holly Dorger, a princpal at the Royal Danish Ballet.
Holly Dorger, a princpal at the Royal Danish Ballet.
Michael Jackson Jr. and Sean Aaron Carmon of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.
Michael Jackson Jr. and Sean Aaron Carmon of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.
James Whiteside, principal dancer at the American Ballet Theater.
James Whiteside, principal dancer at the American Ballet Theater.
 Celine Cassone of the Les Ballet Jazz de Montreal.
Celine Cassone of the Les Ballet Jazz de Montreal.
Book Cover featuring Masha Maddux Dashkina, a principal at the Martha Graham Dance Company.
Book Cover featuring Masha Maddux Dashkina, a principal at the Martha Graham Dance Company.

For more information on this lovely series head to the full story at: Huffingtonpost

 

3. Just an ordinary mosque from the street, but when you get inside – WOW!

The Shah Cheragh is a funerary monument and mosque in Shiraz, Iran and is an important place of pilgrimage and worship. The name translates as ‘King of the Light’, and it’s pretty easy to see why.

Photo: Maite Elorza
Photo: Maite Elorza

When you see it on the outside it’s your average mosque, albeit a fairly grand one, but when you head inside, that’s when the magic happens, as the light reflected from millions of pieces of cut glass transform the interior into a glittering chimera of light.

Photo: Maite Elorza
Photo: Maite Elorza
Photo: Sonia Filinto
Photo: Sonia Filinto
Photo: Fukenoyu
Photo: Fukenoyu
Photo: IslamSciFi
Photo: IslamSciFi
Photo: IslamSciFi
Photo: IslamSciFi

The tomb itself was first erected for the two sons of an important Imam who were hunted down and killed by the caliphate of the time.

Originally, the tomb was a simple structure  but many years later became a place of pilgrimage after a benevolent and pious Queen constructed a larger mosque on the site and ordered it to be built to what it is today – which is magnificent!

Photo: H.L.Tam
Photo: H.L.Tam

For more info and pics head to: wikipedia, flickr

 

4. An all-woman Mariachi band is enchanting listeners around the world

The Mexican folk genre of Mariachi is passed down through the generations and is traditionally an all-male domain, and as a lot of the songs revolve around heartbreak, often their women aren’t exactly cast in a great light.

Photo: Robin Marchant via Getty Images
Photo: Robin Marchant via Getty Images

But one all-women band is changing all that.

Taking their name from the Toloache flower – a trumpet-shaped flower native to Mexico – Flor de Toloache is a Latin Grammy-nominated group who are currently performing at venues around the world to huge acclaim.

581a314e170000b3045bb430
Photo: Flor De Toloache

First established in 2008 as a trio busking in the streets and subways of New York, the band is made up of founding member Mireya Ramos and a rotating cast of musicians whose roots range from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Cuba, Australia, Colombia, Germany, Italy and the United States.

This diversity manifests itself in their music, which has evolved from the traditional Mariachi through to include influences from genres like salsa, Latin jazz, pop, cumbia, hip-hop and soul.

The video below is a lovely 20 minute serenade Mariachi-style, so grab a coffee (or a Pisco Sour and that cute dance partner in the cubicle next door maybe?!), kick back and enjoy!

Guaranteed foot-tapper!  🙂

Source and more information: Huffingtonpost

You can read more of Flor De Toloache on their website @ Mariachinyc

 

5. Some lovely ceramics from bygone days are still relevant in our ‘retro’ age

Early in the 1920’s, a Mrs. Manna was a decorator and ceramicist for leading doll company Lenci, before starting her own business Ceramica Italiana Artistica (or Cia).

Her Turin-based company started turning out lovely ceramic statuettes under the trademark ‘Cia Manna’, and they quickly became hot property for collectors around the world.

Enchanting in their simplicity, today they hint of a gentler bygone era, but I suspect they wouldn’t look out of place in this age of retro-chic either.

"Indian Dancer", c. 1930
“Indian Dancer”, c. 1930
"Indian Dancer", c. 1930
“Indian Dancer”, c. 1930
"Indian Dancers", c. 1930
“Indian Dancers”, c. 1930
"Siamese Dancer", c. 1930
“Siamese Dancer”, c. 1930
"Siamese Flower and Knight", 1940s
“Siamese Flower and Knight”, 1940s
"Tamoa", 1940s-1950s
“Tamoa”, 1940s-1950s
"The Spanish Dancer", 1940s
“The Spanish Dancer”, 1940s
"The Spanish Dancer", 1940s
“The Spanish Dancer”, 1940s
"The Italian Dancer", 1940s
“The Italian Dancer”, 1940s
"The Italian Dancer", 1940s, detail
“The Italian Dancer”, 1940s, detail

Courtesy of Italianways

 

6. These colorized photos of the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun are magnificent.

In 1907, the 5th Earl of Carnarvon hired Egyptologist and archaeologist Howard Carter to undertake excavations in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings.

Carter searched the area for years, and both he and the Earl were about to give up, but decided to give it one more season of digging before the funding ran out.

Photo: Harry Burton© - Tutankhamun's burial mask. Nov 1925
Photo: Harry Burton© – Tutankhamun’s burial mask. Nov 1925

Carter decided to revisit an area already dug over, and on Nov. 4th, 1922, he discovered a step leading to whole stairway, and thus leading to the tomb of Tutankhamun, one of the most important and significant archaeological finds ever made to this day.

Photo: Harry Burton© - Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker open the doors of the innermost shrine and get their first look at Tutankhamun's sarcophagus. Jan 1924
Photo: Harry Burton© – Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker open the doors of the innermost shrine and get their first look at Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus. Jan 1924
At first I could see nothing, the hot air escaping from the chamber causing the candle flame to flicker, but presently, as my eyes grew accustomed to the light, details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues, and gold — everywhere the glint of gold.
                           Howard Carter

The tomb was crammed with thousands of priceless artifacts, including the sarcophagus containing the most famous artifact of all, Tutankhamun’s solid gold death-mask, along with the boy-kings mummified remains.

Photo: Harry Burton© - A ceremonial bed in the shape of the Celestial Cow, surrounded by provisions and other objects in the antechamber of the tomb. Dec 1922
Photo: Harry Burton© – A ceremonial bed in the shape of the Celestial Cow, surrounded by provisions and other objects in the antechamber of the tomb. Dec 1922
Photo: Harry Burton© - A gilded lion bed, clothes chest and other objects in the antechamber. The wall of the burial chamber is guarded by statues. Dec 1922
Photo: Harry Burton© – A gilded lion bed, clothes chest and other objects in the antechamber. The wall of the burial chamber is guarded by statues. Dec 1922
Photo: Harry Burton© - Ornately carved alabaster vases in the antechamber. Dec 1922
Photo: Harry Burton© – Ornately carved alabaster vases in the antechamber. Dec 1922
Photo: Harry Burton© - Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas work on a golden chariot from Tutankhamun's tomb outside the "laboratory" in the tomb of Sethos II. Dec 1923
Photo: Harry Burton© – Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas work on a golden chariot from Tutankhamun’s tomb outside the “laboratory” in the tomb of Sethos II. Dec 1923
Photo: Harry Burton© - Carter examines Tutankhamun's sarcophagus. Dec 1925
Photo: Harry Burton© – Carter examines Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus. Dec 1925
Photo: Harry Burton© - Carter and a worker examine the solid gold innermost sarcophagus. Oct 1925
Photo: Harry Burton© – Carter and a worker examine the solid gold innermost sarcophagus. Oct 1925

Every item was meticulously documented and photographed by photographer Harry Burton throughout the dig – a process that took nearly 8 years.

Photo: Harry Burton© - Under the lion bed in the antechamber are several boxes and chests, and an ebony and ivory chair which Tutankhamun used as a child. Dec 1922
Photo: Harry Burton© – Under the lion bed in the antechamber are several boxes and chests, and an ebony and ivory chair which Tutankhamun used as a child. Dec 1922

It is with these magnificent photographs that we can see the tomb as it was back in 1922, just as the Earl of Carnarvon and archaeologist Howard Carter did when they first set eyes on this incredible discovery.

Photo: Harry Burton© - Lord Carnarvon, financier of the excavation, reads on the veranda of Carter's house near the Valley of the Kings. C1923
Photo: Harry Burton© – Lord Carnarvon, financier of the excavation, reads on the veranda of Carter’s house near the Valley of the Kings. C1923

The photos are also part of a worldwide exhibition which is about to open its doors once again, this time in New York on Nov. 21st. — a MUST for any archaeological nuts out there like myself.

All donations for a flight to NY gratefully accepted.  🙂

For more pictures and info head to: Mashable

Photos were colorized by Dynamichrome 

 

7. A little brain teaser – FIND THE PUSSYCAT!

Yes there’s a cat in amongst the logs – easy when you see it! 🙂

findcat

There – that wasn’t so hard was it? – and it wasted 5 minutes of the Boss’s time too.

You can thank me later!

Source (and the answer in case you need it LOSER!): Mymodernmet

 

8. What’s on my Soundcloud playlist at the mo!

(Time to kick back and relax – is it Xmas yet?!)

 

9. NatGeo Photographer opens a window on one of Christianity’s holiest sites

Stunning pics from photographers Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic for NatGeo, as they joined a team of 30 people to witness what is believed to be the final resting place of Jesus Christ.

The shrine that houses the traditional burial place of Jesus Christ is undergoing restoration inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
The shrine that houses the traditional burial place of Jesus Christ is undergoing restoration inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.

A slab of limestone hewn from the wall of a cave, commonly regarded as the burial bed, has been covered by a marble slab since the mid-1500’s, supposedly to deter pilgrims from removing pieces as souvenirs and to prevent any further damage or destruction.

Workers begin removing the worn marble that has encased the original burial shelf for centuries, exposing a layer of fill material below. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
Workers begin removing the worn marble that has encased the original burial shelf for centuries, exposing a layer of fill material below. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.

Initially the conservation team found only filling underneath the first marble slab, but as they kept digging, they finally came upon another marble slab engraved with a cross. After almost 60 hours of work, they removed this final slab to find the original tomb to be intact.

A conservator cleans the surface of the stone slab venerated as the final resting place of Jesus Christ. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
A conservator cleans the surface of the stone slab venerated as the final resting place of Jesus Christ. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.

While it is archaeologically impossible to tell if this is the actual tomb of Jesus of Nazareth, indirect evidence points to representatives of the Roman emperor Constantine identifying it as such.

Members of the conservation team lift a stone to clean and digitally scan before reinstalling it on the façade of the Edicule, the shrine that houses what is believed to be the tomb of Jesus. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
Members of the conservation team lift a stone to clean and digitally scan before reinstalling it on the façade of the Edicule, the shrine that houses what is believed to be the tomb of Jesus. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
Women pray atop the marble cover of the tomb before it was removed for restoration work. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
Women pray atop the marble cover of the tomb before it was removed for restoration work. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
Franciscan priests visit the traditional site of Jesus' tomb during its renovation in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
Franciscan priests visit the traditional site of Jesus’ tomb during its renovation in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
A Christian nun kneels in prayer at the "burial bed" of Christ inside the tomb shrine, known as the Edicule. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
A Christian nun kneels in prayer at the “burial bed” of Christ inside the tomb shrine, known as the Edicule. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
Steel girders supporting the Edicule will be removed when restoration work is completed next Spring. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.
Steel girders supporting the Edicule will be removed when restoration work is completed next Spring. Photo: Oded Balilty and Dusan Vranic.

National Geographic reports that a transparent window has been cut into the Edicule’s interior wall to expose one of the cave walls.

“This is the Holy Rock that has been revered for centuries, but only now can actually be seen,” the project’s Chief Scientific Supervisor Professor Antonia Moropoulou told National Geographic.

For more information head to NationalGeographic, FoxNews

 

10. Let’s channel Indiana Jones with these gorgeous pics of Petra

The dark narrow gorge leading to the ancient city of Petra called the Siq, is beyond doubt one of the most impressive entrances to a city imaginable.

Many might believe, if they were actually to consider, that it was wind and erosion that formed the Siq, but it was actually tectonic, formed when a deep fissure opened up in the sandstone rock and allowing it to become a waterway in ancient times.

The first glimpse of the Treasury through the Siq. Photo credit: David Bjorgen/Wikimedia (left), txefo/Flickr (right)
The first glimpse of the Treasury through the Siq. Photo credit: David Bjorgen/Wikimedia (left), txefo/Flickr (right)

Petra itself, is thought to date back to as early as 312BC and was first established by a nomadic Arab tribe known as the Nabataeans several centuries before Christ’s birth.

Jordan’s most-visited tourist attraction, Petra was unknown to the western world until 1812 when Swiss explorer Johann Ludwig Burckhardt stumbled upon it whilst traveling in the area, after hearing rumours of an ancient ruined city in a narrow valley near the supposed biblical tomb of Aaron, the brother of Moses.

Unfortunately most people only know Petra from the Indiana Jones film ‘Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade’ – hopefully these beautiful photos will rectify that and prove what an amazing place it actually is – it did with me anyway.

Add that one to the bucket list for sure!

Photo credit: Allan Grey/Flickr
Photo credit: Allan Grey/Flickr
Photo credit: Allan Grey/Flickr
Photo credit: Allan Grey/Flickr
Photo credit: Allan Grey/Flickr
Photo credit: Allan Grey/Flickr
The view of the Siq from the side of the Treasury. Photo credit: www.geographylists.com
The view of the Siq from the side of the Treasury. Photo credit: www.geographylists.com
The Treasury, Petra. Photo credit: Colin Tsoi/Flickr
The Treasury, Petra. Photo credit: Colin Tsoi/Flickr
The Street of Facades. Photo credit: www.geographylists.com
The Street of Facades.  Photo credit: www.geographylists.com
Photo credit: www.geographylists.com
Photo credit: www.geographylists.com
Photo credit: www.geographylists.com
Photo credit: www.geographylists.com

Sources: Amusingplanet, Geographylists

 

Bonus Extra – another little snippet of cuteness from my inbox.

Not sure who she is but this little Chinese kid sure can play those drums – must only be about 5yo too so she deserves the Bonus extra point this week.

Courtesy of: Youtube

 

Hope you enjoyed this weeks list of Interesting stuff off the net guys.

If you’d like to leave a comment below on anything, or want to suggest stuff you’d like to see in the future, or maybe just throw some shade my way, then feel free to use the Comments section below! I aim to please!

Have an awesome week peeps! 🙂

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