The beautiful work of Japanese textile artist Itchiku Kubota

At first, the two don’t seem to fit. A Kimono is a traditional Japanese garment and literally translates to a thing to wear.

And then there’s this:

Itchiku Kubota is a textile artist and painter. His inspiration stemmed from a deep-rooted interest in the long forgotten form of Tsujigahana – a Japanese technique that involves the dyeing, brush painting, embroidery, and metallic leaf.

After a visit to the Tokyo national museum at the age of 20, he vowed to bring back this dye-ing art.

During an interview, Mr.Kubota explains 

“I want the fabric to express something. I want people to feel something. That is the hard part. That is the challenge. That is the effect I want. Art that speaks to people. Art that tells them something.

In the book and video series, Kimono As Art, you get a step-by-step look at the making of his pieces.

Lauren Brevner explains: “I find an immense beauty in art that is produced from labour. The dedication, skill, and patience that come with the meticulous and calculated tasks are awe-inspiring. Itchiku Kubota spent his life reviving a lost art so that we may experience what could have been history.”

Throughout his lifetime, Itchiku Kubota created a legacy. After his death in 2003, it was passed down to his son and successor.

His works remain at the Itchiku Kubota Art Museum in Kawaguchi-ko, Yamanashi, Japan.

The text for this article was first published on laurenbrevner.com. You can read more on her work in my article here.

You can also see more of his incredible work on here.

 

 

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